President JFK-The day he died

 

I didn’t realize President Kennedy, who was gunned down by Lee Harvey Oswald with a $21 gun, was 46 years old when he died.  I remember that day.  I was in art class, in 7th grade, when the announcement came over the P.A. System at 1:20 p.m. The events on Elm Street that day changed each and every one of us, even a kid in middle school.
IMG_2420 JFK, Robert F. Kennedy and Edward M. Kennedy
Jacqueline and John were the only prince and princess this country will ever have.
When we went on our senior trip to Washington D.C. in 1968 he was still very much on the minds of the American people and the magic of Camelot they brought its citizens was still very much alive.
Being from Dover New Hampshire I felt a close connection to this President and his family.  We watched as John John and Caroline grew up and felt their deep hurt and anguish when we watched the funeral.  Something that is still burned in my mind.
As I watched the documentaries that have been airing on PBS I think I picked up on MAYBE a little different story.  I don’t know if its the cop in me or if I’m way off the mark.   JFK, when at the dinner prior to his fatal car ride told his aid to go and get Jacqueline and tell her that he wanted her there with him, I got the impression that he might have been a little controlling,  The documentary said that she always tried to do what JFK wanted.  Just my thoughts but I’m not an expert on the Kennedy’s so take it with a grain of salt.
I’ve been to D.C. lots since then and love the city but hate the traffic and congestion.  The public transit is fantastic so take my advice and don’t even think of driving downtown.
The Smithsonian is a great bargain, FREE, so don’t miss out on this wonderful collection of American history.  Betsy Ross’ flag was being restored when we visted a few years ago.  Just seeing this piece of history brought goose bumps to my skin.  It was so big and in such poor condition I couldn’t believe that it had survived.
“Betsy Ross’s story was published in 1870, 34 years after her death, by her only surviving grandson, William J. Canby, in a paper presented to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The paper included stories he had heard from his grandmother (Betsy Ross) and other family members throughout the years. Canby was 11 years old when his grandmother died, but the stories were kept in his family as an oral tradition. Below is a condensed version of the Betsy Ross story, according to Canby’s paper.

Sitting sewing in her shop one day with her girls around her, several gentlemen entered. She recognized one of these as the uncle of her deceased husband, Col. GEORGE ROSS, a delegate from Pennsylvania to Congress. She also knew the handsome form and features of the dignified, yet graceful and polite Commander in Chief, who, while he was yet COLONEL WASHINGTON had visited her shop both professionally and socially many times, (a friendship caused by her connection with the Ross family). They announced themselves as a committee of congress, and stated that they had been appointed to prepare a flag, and asked her if she thought she could make one, to which she replied, with her usual modesty and self reliance, that “she did not know but she could try; she had never made one but if the pattern were shown to her she had not doubt of her ability to do it.” The committee were shown into her back parlor, the room back of the shop, and Col. Ross produced a drawing, roughly made, of the proposed flag. It was defective to the clever eye of Mrs Ross and unsymmetrical, and she offered suggestions which Washington and the committee readily approved.”

IMG_2531 My husband and I at Hardrock Café D.C. on Veterans Day.
So if you live close to D.C. maybe a daycation would be in order and for the rest that live a day away like we do, well four to seven days is more realistic.

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